PRESS RELEASE                                                                                                                                                                       July 24, 2017

Paige Marlatt Dorr

Office: 916.327.5356

Cell: 916.601.8005

Office E-mail: pdorr@cccco.edu

 

Standouts in Career Education Earn Accolades

as California’s Community Colleges Advance Social and Economic Mobility

Strong Workforce Stars, a new recognition program based on quantified student outcomes,

recognizes more than 100 community college programs at 65 colleges

 

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – More than 100 career education programs delivered by 65 institutions in the California Community Colleges system have earned a spot among the ranks of Strong Workforce Stars for their successes in helping students increase their earning power and social mobility.   

 

Strong Workforce Stars is a new, annual commendation for career education programs, also known as career technical education (CTE), within California’s 114 community colleges whose students show significant gains in factors important for advancing social mobility – a substantial increase in earnings, attainment of a living wage, and/or employment in a job closely matched with the student’s field of study.

 

“Strong Workforce Stars, with its focus on proving student success through data, is another demonstration of how the California Community Colleges is carefully and intentionally building a strong workforce for California and improving social and economic mobility” said California Community Colleges Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley.

 

Career education programs can receive Strong Workforce Stars designation when meeting one or more of the following numerical thresholds:

·         Fifty percent or more increase in student earnings, determined by comparing students’ earnings one year before and one year after exiting the California Community Colleges system. This data is based on a match to the state’s wage file.

·         Seventy percent or more of students attain a regional living wage. This percentage, aligned with a threshold set by the California Workforce Development Board, analyzes the proportion of graduates and skills builders (defined as students whose goal is not to complete a program, but to take classes to increase job skills) who attained the living wage for a single individual in the college’s region. This analysis is based on a match to the state’s wage file and a comparison with data from the Insight Center for Community Economic Development.

·         Ninety percent or more of students report that their current job is close or very close to their field of study. This is based on responses to the system’s CTE Outcomes Survey, which is sent to community college students after they stop taking courses.

Programs can earn more than one Strong Workforce Star, depending on outcomes.

 

Career education programs create skilled workers to fuel regional economies and enable social mobility,” said Van Ton-Quinlivan, vice chancellor for Workforce and Economic Development at California Community Colleges. “These ‘Star’ exemplars ought to be celebrated.”

 

The recognition is based on students who were last enrolled in 2013-14 in career education areas including advanced manufacturing; advanced transportation and renewable energy; agriculture, water, and environmental technologies; education and human development; energy, construction, and utilities; global trade and logistics; health care; information and communication technologies/digital media; life sciences and biotechnology; public and protective services; retail, hospitality, and tourism; and small business.

 

Analysis undertaken by WestEd reveals six commonalities of career education programs that met the Strong Workforce Stars designation:

1.       Data-driven planning: Colleges continuously use data and evidence to direct the development and delivery of their offerings. They also employ labor-market analysis to ensure programs are the optimum size, whether it be limiting enrollment to avoid flooding the local market or expanding participation to address an urgent workforce need.

2.       Outstanding faculty: By working in the industry while teaching, staying connected through industry sector-based associations and participating in professional networks, faculty help to improve students’ employment outcomes.

3.       Career driven: Colleges make a direct connection between program participation and related career opportunities, which can serve as a powerful motivator for students to both enroll in and complete their programs, as well as contribute to their success in the workplace.

4.       Industry driven: Industry sector partners play a critical role in shaping and delivering college programming, often through robust and comprehensive advisory groups.

5.       Student centered: Colleges integrate academic supports and focused educational advising in order to respond to the priorities, experiences, and needs of the students who enroll, whether they are recent high school graduates, working adults, veterans, English-language learners, ex-offenders or students who aspire to transfer to four-year institutions.

6.       Intersegmental partnerships: Through strategies like dual enrollment, the adoption of national curriculum models, articulation agreements and summer bridge programs, colleges jump-start students’ career preparation while they still are enrolled in high school and accelerate workplace entry.

 

Strong Workforce Stars is made possible by accountability and data tool investments established under the system’s Doing What MATTERS for Jobs and Economy framework and its Strong Workforce Program.  Starting 2016, the state of California infused a recurring annual investment of $200 million to spur more and better career education across the 114 community colleges of California - the nation’s largest higher education system.  In the second year of the program, one-sixth of the dollars must be allocated based on contribution to student success outcomes rather than the traditional approach of student enrollment, and Strong Workforce Stars is one way to ascertain progress toward that policy goal.

 

The Strong Workforce Program is a bold step California took to create 1 million more middle-skilled workers to fuel regional economies and advance social mobility, equipping them with certificates, degrees or credentials valued by the labor market.

 

 

 

Strong Workforce metrics are aligned with those of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014, a federal program designed to help job seekers access employment, education, training and support services.

 

The California Community Colleges is the largest system of higher education in the nation composed of 72 districts and 114 colleges serving 2.1 million students per year. Community colleges supply workforce training and basic skills education in English and math, and prepare students for transfer to four-year institutions. The Chancellor’s Office provides leadership, advocacy and support under the direction of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. For more information about the community colleges, please visit californiacommunitycolleges.cccco.edu/, https://www.facebook.com/CACommColleges, or twitter.com/CalCommColleges. The Doing What MATTERS for Jobs and the Economy framework invests in California’s economic growth and global competitiveness through industry-specific partnerships, education, training and services that contribute to a strong workforce for California.

 

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Note to Editors:  Please see attached Workforce Stars awards by college, sector and program.   


 

 

 

 

 

 

2017 California Community Colleges Strong Workforce Stars, listed by college and industry sector. More information and a searchable database are available at http://dwmshowcase.com/workforce_stars.asp.

College

 Industry Sector

Career Education Program

American River College

Life Sciences and Biotechnology

Biotechnology

American River College

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician, Administration of Justice, Police Academy, Fire Technology

Antelope Valley

Advanced Manufacturing

Advanced Manufacturing and Advanced Technology

Antelope Valley

Health

Health and Safety Science

Barstow College

Small Business

Business, Accounting, Career Workforce Readiness, Management

Berkeley City College

Life Sciences and Biotechnology

Biotechnology

Butte College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Pest Control Advisor

Chabot College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Chaffey College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Electrical Systems and Mechanical Drafting

Chaffey College

Global Trade and Logistics

Logistics and Materials Transportation

College of Alameda

Information and Communication Technologies/Digital Media

Computer Information Systems

College of Alameda

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Auto Body and Paint

College of Marin

Health

Medical Assisting, Medical Tech

College of Marin

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician, Administration of Justice, Police Academy, Fire Academy

College of San Mateo

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Electrical Power Systems and Instrumentation

College of San Mateo

Small Business

Entrepreneurship

College of San Mateo

Small Business

Management

College of the Canyons

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Water Technology

College of the Canyons

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician, Administration of Justice and Fire Technology

College of the Desert

Health

Registered Nursing, Licensed Vocational Nursing

College of the Redwoods

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Drafting and 3-D Modeling

College of the Sequoias

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Technology, Construction Technology

College of the Siskiyous

Information and Communication Technologies/Digital Media

Computer Science and Business

College of the Siskiyous

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician, Administration of Justice, Fire Technology

Columbia College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Water Resources Management, Watershed Management Technology, Water Resources Management, Watershed Management Technology, Wastewater Treatment Management

Columbia College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Welding, Metal Sculpture for Entrepreneurs, Technology for Entrepreneurs

Compton Community Educational Center (El Camino College)

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Collision Repair / Painting

Compton Community Educational Center (El Camino College)

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

Contra Costa College

Advanced Manufacturing

Forklift Logistics Operations and Warehouse Management

Copper Mountain College

Small Business

General Business

Crafton Hills College

Education and Human development

Child Development, Early Childhood Education, Associate Teacher, Master Teacher, Site Supervisor, Teacher

Crafton Hills College

Small Business

Business Administration and Business Management

Cuyamaca College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Ornamental Horticulture

Cuyamaca College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Wastewater Management and Environmental Health and Safety

De Anza College

Advanced Manufacturing

Digital Manufacturing Technology

De Anza College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Energy Management and Building Science, Environmental Resource Management and Pollution Prevention

El Camino College

Advanced Manufacturing

Machine Tool Technology

Evergreen Valley College

Advanced Manufacturing

Advanced Manufacturing

Evergreen Valley College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Technology

Evergreen Valley College

Small Business

Accounting

Folsom Lake College

Life Sciences and Biotechnology

Medical Laboratory Technician

Foothill College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Construction Crafts

Fullerton College

Public and Protective Services

Administration of Justice and Police Academy

Golden West College

Information and Communication Technologies/Digital Media

Digital Arts and Media

Hartnell College

Health

Alcohol and Other Drugs

Imperial Valley College

Health

Alcohol and Drug Studies

Laney College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Construction Management, Welding Technology, Wood Technology, Carpentry, Electricity/Electronics Technology, Machine Technology

Laney College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Electricity/Electronics Technology, Building Automation Systems, Commercial HVAC Systems, Residential and HVAC Refrigeration, Carpentry, Welding Technology, Construction Management

Laney College

Global Trade and Logistics

Global Trade and Logistics

Laney College

Information and Communication Technologies/Digital Media

Information and Communication Technologies/Digital Media

Los Angeles City College

Health

Radiologic Technology, Registered Nursing, Dental Technology, Dietetics

Los Angeles Harbor College

Small Business

Architecture, Accounting, Child Development, Real Estate, Business

Los Angeles Mission College

Health

Nutrition, Foods, and Culinary Arts

Los Medanos College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Technology

Los Medanos College

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician, Administration of Justice, Police Academy, Fire Technology

Mendocino College

Advanced Manufacturing

Textile Arts

Mendocino College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Technology

Mendocino College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Sustainable Construction and Energy Technology

Merritt College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Landscape Design and Maintenance

Merritt College

Health

Community and Social Services

Merritt College

Small Business

Real Estate

Mira Costa College

Health

Registered Nurse and Licensed Vocational Nurse

Monterey Peninsula College

Public and Protective Services

Administration of Justice and Fire Technology

Moorpark College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Exotic Animal Training and Management

Moorpark College

Health

Radiologic Technology and Nursing

Moreno Valley College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Wildland Fire Behavior and Weather

Mt San Jacinto College

Advanced Manufacturing

General Engineering Technology

Mt. San Antonio College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Vet Technician

Mt. San Antonio College

Life Sciences and Biotechnology

Histotechnician

Napa Valley College

Advanced Manufacturing

Machine Tools Technology, Welding Technology Digital Designs, Graphic Technologies

Napa Valley College

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician, Administration of Justice, Police Academy

Napa Valley College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Viticulture and Winery Technology

Napa Valley College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Welding Technologies

Napa Valley College

Health

Psychiatric Technician, Registered Nursing, Vocational Nursing, Respiratory Care, Paramedic Care

Norco College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Construction Technology

Ohlone College

Health

Registered Nurse, Respiratory Therapist, Physical Therapist Assistant

Ohlone College

Public and Protective Services

Administration of Justice

Orange Coast College

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician

Palo Verde College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Environmental Technology/Fire Science Technology

Palomar College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Water and Wastewater

Reedley College

Public and Protective Services

Administration of Justice, Corrections, Fire Technology

Sacramento City College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics

Sacramento City College

Health

Registered Nursing

San Diego City College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

San Diego Mesa College

Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism

Fashion

San Diego Miramar College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Aviation Maintenance Technology

San Joaquin Delta College

Health

Registered Nurse, Psychiatric Technician, Radiologic Technology, Speech Language Pathology

San Joaquin Delta College

Public and Protective Services

Administration of Justice, Corrections, Fire Technology, Basic Peace Officer Academy

San Joaquin Delta College

Life Sciences and Biotechnology Sector

Electron Microscopy

San Jose City College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Construction Technology, Residential Maintenance and Construction, Residential Carpentry, Construction Technology

Santa Ana College

Advanced Manufacturing

Manufacturing Technology

Santa Ana College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Technology

Santa Barbara City College

Global Trade and Logistics

International Business and Trade

Santiago Canyon College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Carpentry and Electrician Apprenticeship

Santiago Canyon College

Energy, Construction, and Utilities

Electrician

Shasta College

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Welding Technology, Water, Wastewater Technology

Shasta College

Public and Protective Services

Emergency Medical Technician, Administration of Justice, Fire Technology

Sierra College

Retail, Hospitality, and Tourism

Fashion Industries

Skyline College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Technology

Solano College

Advanced Transportation and Renewable Energy

Automotive Technology, Automotive Technician, Automotive Body

Solano College

Life Sciences and Biotechnology

Applied Biotechnology and Industrial Biotechnology

Southwestern College

Life Sciences and Biotechnology

Medical Laboratory Technology

West Hills Coalinga

Health

Psych Tech

West Hills Coalinga

Agriculture, Water, and Environmental Technologies

Agriculture Technology and Sciences

West Hills Coalinga

Small Business

Accounting, Business, Child Development

West Valley College

Small Business

Accounting